Swami Satyananda Describes Enlightenment

From Meditations from the Tantras by Swami Satyananda

During meditation one experiences a feeling of no anxiety. One’s normal self-interest seems to disappear and one feels the same, if not more, for other people as for oneself. Life no longer seems fragmented by opposing ideas and opinions. Everything merges into one composite whole. External events enter the mind, are absorbed, yet without causing the usual disturbances or reverberations.

All things take their normal course of action, without any unnecessary hustle or bustle. Fear, the biggest trouble-maker in life, no longer exists. Even fear of death disappears, and the idea of death seems almost superficial, non-existent and unimportant. The usual ups and downs of life are replaced by a continual and elevating feeling of the joyfulness of life. Everything seems to fit together like a jig-saw puzzle.

Even normally opposing religious, philosophical and cultural ideas seem to be in unison with one another. Everything fits. The past and future seem to be unimportant. They lack meaning. What is important is the eternal now. Living and experiencing the totality of the present seems to be the only important thing to do. The present is so absorbing that the mind automatically fixes itself on the work or action being done.

Efficiency and perfection become the natural course of events. The normal impediments to efficiency such as worry, anger, no longer block the total absorption of the mind. Under these conditions work becomes play and play becomes work. There is no differentiation. Life becomes so joyful that it needs no ambition, no justification, no reason; it is sufficient just to be.

Remember that it is through frustration, dissatisfaction, unhappiness that we try to find a reason for life, or follow modes of life that are unnatural to our very being.

One does not lose one’s zest, nor does one lose one’s interest in the activities of the world. One merely ceases to worry about things. Superficial worry may be there but internally there is perfect peace.

All the preliminaries associated with preparing one self for meditational experiences no longer seem important or necessary. In other words, all the rules laid down in the yamas and niyamas for example, detachment, renunciation and so on, are no longer necessary. The experience of meditation stands way above these rules. The rules no longer apply. These rules are designed to eliminate mental disturbances.

But now the individual can do anything: exciting activities, be angry, be happy, all the multifarious actions in life. These actions no longer adversely affect his inner being. He goes through life as a witness. Sense enjoyments are not diminished; in fact they are heightened. One takes greater delight in feeling the outside world impinge on one’s being.

Everything unites to become one. The faculty of intuition is the medium of knowledge. Objects show their deeper and essential characteristics. Everything assumes an attitude of friendliness and the universe assumes a state of helpfulness; opposition to one’s nature no longer exists. Every atom shimmers with life and vitality.

The progress of time and the immensity of space lose their fixed meaning, they are seen as nothing more than a manifestation of the universe. Time begins to stand still and the outer depths of space no longer seem so far away. The stars come within grasping distance. Infinity and eternity become almost tangible. Existence is seen as the permanent aspect of everything.

One realizes that one’s being is intimately bound up with everything that is. As such, the ego no longer seems important or even a reality. One normally sees oneself as a small, insignificant part of the universe, as a small cog in a large wheel, a small particle in unending space and time.

One often feels completely isolated and often alienated from other parts of existence. One feels alone, and very mortal. One even never suspects that one can overcome this situation. Most people merely shrug their shoulders and fatalistically accept their fate. Meditation changes all this. One realizes through meditation that one is a necessary, intimate and important part of the universe. One starts to relate deeply to everything that exists. They are no longer separate entities. You are That.

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3 Responses to Swami Satyananda Describes Enlightenment

  1. Christine says:

    This is really good stuff!

    “Remember that it is through frustration, dissatisfaction, unhappiness that we try to find a reason for life, or follow modes of life that are unnatural to our very being.

    One does not lose oneโ€™s zest, nor does one lose oneโ€™s interest in the activities of the world. One merely ceases to worry about things. Superficial worry may be there but internally there is perfect peace.”

    Maybe I’m just not in the right mind frame to understand it, or maybe because I just woke up an hour ago ๐Ÿ™‚ , I did not understand the last paragraph at all! lol

    “One often feels completely isolated and often alienated from other parts of existence.”

    YET…

    “One realizes through meditation that one is a necessary, intimate and important part of the universe. One starts to relate deeply to everything that exists. They are no longer separate entities.”

    Not quite sure how those two statements fit together…but otherwise, I really loved this.

  2. Kiwi Yogi says:

    Hi Christine,

    In this part he is referring to the experience of unenlightened people. How “one normally sees oneself as a small, insignificant part of the universe.” So isolation and alienation belong to the average person, not the enlightened.

    ๐Ÿ™‚

  3. Christine says:

    Ok, thanks for clearing that up. ๐Ÿ™‚

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